MARINE PROTECTED AREAS NEED TO BE MANAGED ADAPTIVELY

Marine protected areas work but they are dependent on complementary management, and should be managed adaptively to achieve their full potential.

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THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE GREAT BARRIER REEF

Are theoretical difficulties in implementing adaptive plans real? Yes, but adaptive spatial planning will depend on different elements - such as government support or strong champions - in different contexts.

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THE PLAN OF THE DAY

Plans are useless but planning is indispensible" said Dwight D. Eisenhower. Here we tell you why this is the case when planning for environmental management or conservation.

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ARE YOU TAKING ADVANTAGE OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR CONSERVATION?

Opportunities for furthering conservation projects can be created, a result of external shocks and existing within the system. Here we discuss how these can be identified and leveraged.

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OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGES OF ADAPTIVE SPATIAL PLANNING

How much do people depend on the Great Barrier Reef? We review existing knowledge on the value of ecosystem services it provides, and discuss how these values are impacted by adjacent regions.

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CAN SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS HELP SYSTEMATIC CONSERVATION PLANNING?

Social network analysis can support conservation planning decisions, by: identifying stakeholders, characterizing their relationships; strategic networking; and prioritizing conservation actions.

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MINIMIZING THE COST OF KEEPING OPTIONS OPEN

Currently coastal plans are developed around 1 sea level rise scenario. Yet, better decisions for development and the environment are made by considering the probability associated to a range of scenarios and impacts.

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SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS THAT MAKE IMPLEMENTING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS FEASIBLE

We assessed social characteristics associated to resource management. Villages with management had higher social capital, land-sea ownership disputes, and more incentives for participation.

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GAINS FROM OPPORTUNISTIC AND SYSTEMATIC CONSERVATION

Large gains towards achieving marine reserves, which protect all species, were made by communities in Fiji. A more systematic approach can help close remaining gaps.

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INCORPORATING MANAGEMENT EFFECTIVENESS WHEN ASSESSING GAPS IN BIODIVERSITY REPRESENTATION

Understanding the relative contribution of management to achieving conservation objectives is critical when assessing conservation achievements. In Fiji, different assumptions  can lead to very different conclusions.

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CHALLENGES FOR IMPLEMENTING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN THE CORAL TRIANGLE

Planners will face multiple issues of  scale when trying to develop and apply regional scale plans at a local scale. In this study, we review these and identify mechanisms to overcome them.

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EVIDENCE OF THE BENEFITS OF MARINE PROTECTED AREA

The Great Barrier Reef provides a globally significant demonstration of the effectiveness of large-scale networks of marine reserves in contributing to integrated, adaptive management.

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IN BRAZIL'S MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTED?

The protection Brazil's marine environment is poor, with less than 1.9% of Brazil’s marine jurisdiction within MPAs and 0.14% within no-take areas.

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WORKING WITH UNCERTAIN SOCIAL DATA

We present a framework to help researchers and practitioners estimate social survey uncertainty and use these estimates to systematically address uncertainty within spatial planning analysis.

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UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACTS OF THE MARINE PARK REZONING ON COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN

Socioeconomic data helps minimizes negative impacts on stakeholders in marine protected area plans, however not all impacts can be avoided so complementary tools (e.g. structural adjustment packages) are needed. 

BIODIVERSITY RISKS FROM FOSSIL FUEL EXTRACTION

The expansion of fossil fuel extraction in northern South America and the western Pacific Ocean pose major threats to the existing biodiversity from associated deforestation, contamination and wastewater discharge.

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WHAT ARE ECOREGIONAL PLANS GOOD FOR?

Our assessment of TNCs ecoregional plans highlight various benefits developed through planning including: guiding investments, buiding a shared vision and developing partnerships among institutions.

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SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM FRAMEWORK INFORMS CONSERVATION PLANNING

Linking conservation planning to a social–ecological systems framework can lead to a more thorough understanding and integration of human–environment interactions into conservation planning decisions.

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RECOMENDATIONS OF CORAL REEF GOVERNANCE FOR DEVELOPING NATIONS

MPA design in developing countries will require merging community and regional planning approaches, incorporating the human dimensions of reef systems and their linkages with reef ecology and adaptive planning.

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PRINCIPLES FOR CONNECTING NO-TAKE RESERVES

We update the general recommendations for the location, size and spacing of reserves based on emerging data on larval dispersal in corals and reef fishes, and on considerations for maintaining genetic diversity.

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ESTIMATING EXISTING AND FUTURE FISHING AREAS

We developed a method to model existing and potential future opportunity costs for multiple gear types in a marine environment and can be applied to other regions using existing species data.

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